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explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general and two women who soon found themselves at the heart of american power. the lid came off the scandal last friday with an admission of adult tri by general david petraeus, the revered military commander who had become the head of the c.i.a. he had cheated on his wife of 38 years with paula broadwell, a married former military intelligence officer who became close to the general while writing his biography, which she then publicized. >> i think he is a terrific role model for young people. >> how does this scandal unfold? it began when another woman, jill kelley, contacted the f.b.i. during the summer after receiving a series of anonymous harassing e-mails. the f.b.i. traced the messages to paula broadwell, and while looking at her account, found evidence of meetings with david petraeus. petraeus admitted it and resigned as head of the c.i.a. and jill kelley herself was exchanging inappropriate e-mail with
petraeus and about when the f.b.i. first uncover evidence of it. good evening. i'm geoffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight we get the latest on the time line as we know it and the implications for the intelligence agency. >> brown: then gay rights add voaks won their first victory at the ballot box last week. ray suarez examines the significance of voters in three states approving same-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-time author and iraq war veteran kevin powers about his novel, "the yellow birds." that's all ahead on tonig
compromised. >> the fbi is one of the 16 intelligence agencies, once they started looking into whether or not there had been a compromise, the lawmakers who oversee the cia feel they should have at least been told that there was -- that there was something going on. >> she had some security clearance but there was question about whether she was in possession of cigarettes and how did she get them? >> exactly. -- in possession of secrets and how did she get them? >> they must have come from somewhere else. there has been some sort of assessment of those documents and has been determined it does not pose a major threat that she had them. >> the fbi started this investigation in the summer. who else knew about this before members of congress and the public and journalists found out about it last friday? >> aye in may, it was brought to the attention of the near -- of the public. it took the fbi some time to figure, who was sending them because there were set from an anonymous e-mail account. by the end of december the had traced it to her and in the process of looking at her e- mail, they
of the investigation. the f.b.i. has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed. we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done. and my main hope right now is-- is that he and his family are able to move on and that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> reporter: the president was pressed on whether he should have been informed sooner of the f.b.i.'s investigation. he said he was withholding judgment. >> i think you're going to have to talk to the f.b.i. in terms of what their general protocols are when it comes to what started off as a potential criminal investigation. and one of the challenges here is-- is that we're not supposed to meddle in, you know, criminal investigations. and that's been our practice. and so my expectation is-- is that they followed protocols that they already established. what i'll say is that if-- it is also possible that had we been told, then you'd be sitting here asking a question about, why were you interfering in a criminal investigation? so, you know, i think it's best right now for us to just se
that the general came to the fbi's attention during an investigation. what can you tell us? >> yeah, we're hearing that too. i want to stress that this is very early in the story. so a lot of information is hard to nail down at this point. but we're being told that yes, this is not necessarily a case of the general, the former general stepping up doing the right thing and admitting to an affair but being flushed out. being forced to admit it because of an fbi investigation into e-mail access of the director's e-mail. >> suarez: e-mail access by the woman in question, paula broadwell, the author of "all in" >> right, exactly, presumably by this author who it written his biography, very glowing account of the general. and spent extensive time with the general in war zones. >> suarez: so these kinds of stories, in another place in the government, in another position in government, would an official be able to ride this out? is the cea different from serving in other places in government? >> well, you know, even in this case you have a few voices out there who think petraeus could have written this ou
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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